Here are 5 new laws starting in 2022 in New York

Like every year, with a new year, new laws have been adopted and come into force on the 1st of the year.

2022 is no different here in western New York. There are several new laws that local lawmakers passed in 2021 that will begin this Saturday or very soon after.

While most of these laws won’t have a major impact on you and your life, I have found 5 laws that will play a big part in the lives of New Yorkers.

From a pay raise to being able to buy marijuana legally, these 5 laws will have some sort of influence on your life in 2022.

Of course, the most important is the legalization of marijuana in New York State. Adult use was approved in 2021, but the biggest change will come with the ability to buy it legally from a store. Currently, cities in New York State have until Friday, December 31 to register or opt out of having marijuana dispensaries in their city or within their city limits.

The biggest incentive for many people to allow the sale is that the tax money collected from these dispensaries will stay in that town or city. If a location pulls out, it will not receive any of the taxes levied on sales of legal marijuana.

The state is expected to receive between $ 243 million and $ 300 million in tax revenue from the legal sale of marijuana. In addition, the cannabis industry is expected to create nearly 60,000 new jobs in the state in 2022.

Discover 5 new laws that will impact you in 2022.

Here are 5 new laws starting in 2022 in New York

With a new year comes new laws that could impact you.

Here are 5 new laws starting in 2022 in New York

With a new year comes new laws that could impact you.

LOOK: What important laws were passed in the year you were born?

The data in this list was acquired from reliable online sources and media. Read on to find out which major law was passed in the year you were born, and learn its name, vote count (if any), impact, and meaning.

Source link

About Teresa G. Wilson

Check Also

Tampa City Council passes new noise ordinance, but legal precedent indicates it may be unconstitutional | Tampa Bay News | Tampa

Click to enlarge LC staff A crowd watches an outdoor concert at The Bricks in …